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How to start a dental practice

How To Start A Dental Practice: A Dental Checklist

Starting out a new dental practice is a huge endeavor. From planning the initial concept of your business to stocking supplies, there may be a lot to do and consider before you even open the doors to see patients. In order to help you organize your efforts and be better prepared, you must understand the scope of what needs to happen in each aspect of your new business. 

While many of the action items below appear simple, they do require hours of research, financial budget, professional assistance, committee approval, applications, and more. So once we go through the checklist, we shall discuss a few points from it in detail below. 

Remember, it may not be possible for you to undertake all these tasks yourself and you might need to hire professional services in order to assist you. You will also need a trustworthy dental supplier and that is where we come in. Noble Dental Supplies has been serving the global dental community since 1978. We offer discounted dental products and you can easily browse through our range of supplies by clicking on this link - https://www.nobledentalsupplies.com/. 

Here’s a dental checklist to quickly guide you on how to start a dental practice one task at a time. 

Starting a New Dental Practice Checklist

  • Initial concerns
  • Decide if you want to start a brand new practice or buy into an existing one
  • Sketch out a business plan
  • Arrange financing
  • Buy or lease office space
  • Plan out your specialties and services
  • Decide practice hours and holidays

  • Human Resources
  • Hire a lawyer & an accountant
  • Put out advertisements to hire
  • Check applications and references
  • Complete license verification, interview candidates and hire
  • Fill out employment eligibility I-9 forms and check policies & benefits
  • Take support from human resource solutions to make sure everything is in order
  • Begin training and orientation

  • Insurance policies
  • Get Life insurance
  • Professional liability malpractice insurance
  • Disability income insurance
  • Workman’s compensation
  • ERISA bonds
  • Business loan protection insurance
  • Business overhead expense insurance
  • Entity malpractice insurance
  • Business owner’s protection insurance
  • Employment practices liability insurance
  • Data breach insurance

  • Obtaining Finances
  • Establish credit accepted and pricing
  • Become a provider listed with major insurance providers
  • Obtain required equipment, hardware and software for accepting payments
  • Consider payment plans you will offer
  • Make arrangements to accept cash (banking, safe, change and so on)
  • Secure accounting assistance as needed
  • Setup state and federal taxes and acquire IRS tax ID number

  • Clinical Requirements
  • Stock up on supplies 
  • Ordering affordable dental supplies was never this convenient - https://www.nobledentalsupplies.com/ 
  • Buy equipment and schedule installation
  • Choose and partner with a dental laboratory
  • Hire medical waste management service
  • Consider the amenities you’d like to offer your patients and in the waiting area
  • Determine software needs for finances, call tracking, appointment schedules, billings and coding. 
  • Marketing
  • Launch your practice website
  • Make online listings of your practice info wherever applicable
  • Set up a review page for your service on the website
  • Create social media pages
  • Create a practice email account
  • Get a logo designed and get it on some merchandise to imprint brand image
  • Regulations & Licensing
  • Get local zoning and building occupancy permits
  • Get a state dental license and a controlled substance license
  • You’ll need HIPAA compliance
  • You’ll need to register as a provider with the centers for Medicare & Medicaid services
  • You will also need infection control standards compliance and OSHA compliance

Buying a dental practice can seem overwhelming at first, but the rewards of being your own boss and running your own office can make it all worth it. But first, let’s briefly discuss a few points from the above checklist in detail. 

 

  • Understanding your budget

    Estimate as best as you can for the initial costs to get your office up and running AND to sustain day-to-day operating expenses for at least the first few months. Most importantly, predict in advance any unexpected costs to ensure there is money available, just in case. This fact is overlooked very often by new dental practices and before they know it, they start relying on credit cards and scramble to find further capital.

  • Good Location 

    It’s a good idea to research the area you want to locate your practice in before you settle on a place. This will help you gain understanding of the local market. Ideally, your location should be accessible, in proximity to your targeted patients, and most importantly, it should be within your budget. You also want to avoid an area where there are a lot of practitioners already.

  • Equipment and Supplies


    Buying dental equipment for the practice can be a lengthy and costly process. First of all, in order to run a business smoothly, you need to make sure that you’re buying your dental supplies in bulk and from a trustworthy name. Noble Dental Supplies has been in the business since the past 42 years. We offer facilities for quick ordering and re-ordering of your dental supplies and equipment as well as heavy discounts on bulk ordering.
  • Hiring Staff

     It’s important to start thinking about hiring before you’re ready to move into a new office. Make sure you make time into your schedule to properly vet and hire suitable candidates. There are other considerations besides salary that you’ll need to budget for which include insurance, time off and other benefits.
  • Legal Requirements 

    It can take months to earn credentials for your practice to accept a private and government insurance. So don’t wait until the last minute to handle the legal aspects. You also need to make sure you’re properly licensed in your state, have a national provider identifier number and are registered with the DEA. You must also comply with all other local regulations specific to your area. It’s a good idea to retain a healthcare attorney to assist so you can be sure you’re not missing anything. 

  • Marketing

    You must implement a marketing plan that advertises your practice across local print, TV and radio stations, as well as on online portals. A website with clear directions for setting up an appointment is a good place to start.

Want to be prepared for 2nd wave of pandemic

Five Best Items to Have During a Pandemic/ How Should You Prepare For a Pandemic /5 Items to Stock up During the Pandemic

The World Health Organization has declared Covid-19 a pandemic. As the total number of cases in the United States exceed 1 million earlier this week, the WHO has set guidelines for the public to prepare themselves for the effect of the pandemic.

Covid-19, the novel coronavirus that first caused an outbreak in China in 2019 has rapidly infected people around the globe. According to the CDC, the most vulnerable to this viral threat are people over the age of 60 and those with chronic diseases, such as heart disease, diabetes and lung disease. Everyone around the world has been urged to stay at home as much as possible and practice social distancing. The virus can cause symptoms ranging from cough to high fever, shortness of breath, and in some cases, it can be deadly, particularly in those populations most at risk.

The first thing you need to do and this is most important. You must not panic. Even though the term pandemic can sound scary, it doesn’t mean the world is ending. Depending on the scale of the pandemic, there can be interruptions to supply chains and economic repercussions. We’ve already seen multiple reports of people stocking up on essentials all at the same time, which has left supermarkets out of stock.

  If you’re unable to easily purchase supplies  at short notice, it is worth being prepared so that you can be comfortable staying home if you or someone in your family does get sick and needs to remain in isolation. As the Coronavirus continues its rapid spread internationally and across the U.S. many Americans are following public health advice from the Centers from Disease Control and Prevention to prepare for the possibility of a lengthy home stay.  

  So it’s important to have what you need in order to remain at home for a longer period, possibly weeks. That way experts say you’ll be prepared if you need to decrease contact and socialization in case you get sick, or try to prevent illness if there’s an outbreak of coronavirus in your communiy, but rather than panicking and buying more than you need, it’s about being adequately stocked. Just in case you need to shelter in place, or in case stores have limited supplies for some time. 

Read on to know more about the best five items to stock up and how you need to prepare yourself for the pandemic, according to experts

  • Medications

    It’s a better idea to have a month’s supply of any medications you might be taking, than running out of stock and not finding any at the last moment. Keep handy any self-care supplies, including items needed to manage chronic disease like blood glucose test trips for diabetes, etc.

     “Check to ensure you have at least a 30-day supply of your prescription medications, and have other health supplies on hand, including pain relievers, stomach remedies, cough and cold medicines, fluids with electrolytes, and vitamins,” advises Anthony Tornetta, a spokesperson for the American Red Cross. Also keep a thermometer and medications to reduce fever handy.


  • Stock Food

    Make sure you get foods you like and are comfortable preparing. While the focus should be to stock up on things that won’t go bad in storage, such as soup and canned food; avoid purchasing things that you won’t end up consuming.

     “Non-perishable, easy-to-prepare items are the best to have on hand. These could be things already in your pantry, such as canned goods or snack bars that can last and be easily stored. If you have an infant, make sure to stock up on extra baby food and formula,” Tornetta adds. “Similarly, if you have pets, make sure you have extra pet food in your home as well.” Make sure you have at least two-week’s worth of these supplies for every person in your household. Just make sure to regularly replace any perishable foods and don’t neglect non-perishable stocks. Eating well supports overall health and can bolster immunity at a time when that’s critical. 

  • Stock Up on Cleaning Supplies 

    Regular hand-washing is important to prevent the spread of disease including coronavirus. At home, soap and, water are more than sufficient. If for some reason, you eventually need to leave your quarantine, it’s a good idea to have antibacterial wipes and/or hand sanitizer gel. Make sure your hand sanitizer is at least 60% alcohol. Get your hands on alcohol-based sanitizer in the comfort of your home, by clicking here - https://www.nobledentalsupplies.com/hand-sanitizer-gel-70-alcohol-w-aloe-mark3.

     Noble Dental Supplies offers high-quality yet cost-effective enzymatic & ultrasonic cleaners, surface barriers and sterilization pouches. Stock up on your cleaning supplies by placing your order here - https://www.nobledentalsupplies.com/infection-control-products.

     Make sure you have all you need to keep your home sanitized. You should have disinfectant sanitizers & tissues, such as Kleenex and paper towels, Gentry suggests. You should also have wipes and diapers and any other supplies you need if you have a baby, he advises. 

  • Wearing a Mask 

    We now know from recent studies that a significant portion of individuals with coronavirus lack symptoms (‘asymptomatic’) and that even those who eventually develop symptoms (pre-symptomatic’) can transmit the virus to others before showing symptoms. This means that the virus can spread between people interacting in close proximity – for example speaking, coughing, or sneezing – even if those people are not exhibiting symptoms. In light of this new evidence, CDC recommends wearing cloth face coverings in public settings where other social distancing measures are difficult to maintain (e.g., grocery stores and pharmacies), especially in areas of significant community-based transmission.

  • Plan Ahead

    You must plan ahead when it comes to emergency, so as you stock up on goods, make sure you put a plan in place to monitor the spread of the virus in your community and neighborhood. This plan will guide you in case you get sick. Keep yourself up to date with local and international news as well as national updates from the CDC. 

You must plan ahead when it comes to emergency, so as you stock up on goods, make sure you put a plan in place to monitor the spread of the virus in your community and neighborhood. This plan will guide you in case you get sick. Keep yourself up to date with local and international news as well as national updates from the CDC.

Want to be prepared for pandemic

How To Do Your Part In Preventing A Second Wave Of Coronavirus


The Director of the CDC, Robert Redfield in an interview with the Washington Post last week, said that the second wave of Coronavirus, a disease caused by the novel coronavirus, could be worse than the current one that shook the world. “There’s a possibility that the assault of the virus on our nation next winter will be more difficult than the one we just went through,” he said, because it would coincide with the annual flu epidemic, which killed 24,000 to 62,000 people last year alone and caused 18-26 million hospital visits.

Even though several hours later, during Trump’s daily coronavirus press briefing, Redfield was forced to take back his statement saying it is still going to be “more difficult and potentially more complicated, but that doesn’t mean it’s going to be worse”. 

As of today roughly 80,000 Americans have died from the coronavirus with a vast majority of them happening in the New York, New Jersey area. For a comparison, more than the 47,434 Americans were killed in combat during the Vietnam War. The total number of cases in the United States exceeded 1 million earlier this week. The 1st four months of this crisis will assuredly mean that when we get out of this, we will all be different people in a very different world. 

The coronavirus pandemic may have slowed down in many parts of the country because of strict social distancing efforts but we would still hold off on planning any parties, vacations or trips to the office for a while at least. Experts say the virus won’t be a thing of the past anytime soon. 

A second round of Covid-19 cases is ‘inevitable’ as soon as fall arrives, says the country’s top infectious disease doctor, Dr. Anthony Fauci, Director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases. As people increasingly try to resume regular life and more states ease or lift their stay-at-home orders, he says that he is ‘almost certain’ that the virus will come back, because it is so transmissible and globally spread. According to him Americans could be in for ‘a bad fall and a bad winter’, if the country is ill-prepared.

There are many aspects of the virus that remain unknown for scientists, but older viruses are offering some clues. People are usually infected by 4 common coronaviruses that were 1st identified in the mid-1960s, according to the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and those tend to increase multifold in winter months.

Dr. Greg Poland, a professor of medicine and infectious diseases at the Mayo Clinic says that Covid-19 is likely to follow that pattern. If that happens, a second wave of the virus would return just in time for the start of flu season. The flu has been a constant threat to Americans and has been devastating in recent years. The CDC estimates that there were at least 39 million cases of the flu in the US and at least 24,000 deaths during the 2019-2020 seasons. He says that the combination of a second wave of Covid-19 with flu season could create ‘a lot of confusion’ because of their overlap in symptoms and it could also put a heavy strain on the health care system.

It appears that the novel coronavirus is likely to keep spreading for at least another 18 months. There are several possible scenarios for the course of the pandemic, but the worst of them is s second wave of infections just like the 1918 influenza pandemic, according to a report by the Center for Infectious Disease Research and Policy at the University of Minnesota. 

Mike Osterholm, CIDRAP Director, co-authored a report released recently that recommended the US prepare for a worst-case scenario. The report includes preparation guidelines for a second big wave of coronavirus infections in the fall and winter. 

How to Prevent Second Wave of Coronavirus

According to health experts, the coming months would be a good time to prepare for a potential second outbreak of the virus.

  • Hospitals and clinics should refurbish their stocks of PPE (Personal Protective Equipment) and testing supplies. Order your PPE with zero hassles by clicking here -
    https://www.nobledentalsupplies.com/kleenguard-a70-chemical-spray-protective-yellow-coveralls-12cs-kimberly-clark
  • People should try to get healthier if possible and continue using face masks for the time being. Gatherings should be kept to no more than 10 people at a time.
  • As cities reopen, local officials should make plans to swiftly reissue stay-at-home orders or other strict social distancing measures in the future, in case it is needed.
  • Health officials across the country must continue focusing on expanding coronavirus testing, contact tracing and treatment, said Dr. Helen Boucher, Chief of the Geographic Medicine and Infectious Diseases Division at Tufts University Medical Center. Improving the way health workers handle the coronavirus pandemic will be key, so the country is ‘as prepared as we can be’ when it’s time to face an outbreak of both the coronavirus and the flu.  Check out all our discounted medical supplies at https://www.nobledentalsupplies.com/. 

    While most experts believe that people who have recovered from the virus will have some sort of immunity, Poland says it is unclear how strong that immunity might be, how long it might last and the accuracy of antibody tests is inconsistent. A lot of hope is being placed on the fact that there are no definitive answers yet, because there’s still a lot scientists don’t know. 

    Even though the worst is over, the months to come are not going to be ‘good’ but merely ‘less bad’. All in all, we’re probably living with this virus affecting our lives for one to two years, unless there is a breakthrough and really speedy production and distribution of a vaccine. 

     

 

Re Opening your practice

Getting Back To Normal And How Dentists Can Start Stocking Up Again/

Tips on Reopening Your Dental Practice Post Coronavirus 

As the nation begins to slowly reopen different sectors of the economy, it is important to consider how this “return to practice” will work for the dental industry.

Natasha Lee, DDS, a practicing dentist in San Francisco, was appointed for this effort by the Gov. Gavin Newsom to California’s Economic Recovery Task Force. Dr. Lee is also a member of CDA’s Covid-19 Clinical Care Workgroup and Economic Recovery Workgroup. 


The federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services and the California Department of Public Health in March and Early April, issued guidance that dentists should perform only urgent and emergency care. This guidance was driven by data that demonstrated an alarming rise in community transmission across the country and the need to flatten the Covid-19 curve of infection and death. It was also done in order to protect dental personnel and their patients from the virus. CDA, ADA and most state dental organizations issued recommendations consistent with the federal and respective state authorities regarding how to apply the guidance in serving patients during the crisis.

In addition to enormous advocacy for economic relief, the next critical phase of work is to address recommendations regarding when the profession may resume thorough patient care and what practice changes will be needed to provide that kind of care. 

CDA President Richard Nagy, DDS, and California State Dental Director Jay Kumar, DDS, have established a workgroup composed of dental practitioners, academicians and researchers to help establish the recommendations for this futuristic path.

The workgroup’s return-to-practice guidance will be informed by dental office infection control fundamentals and Covid-19 specific research and advisories. Also, the workgroup is monitoring federal and state advisories and conditions for reopening the economy.

While there are many details that still need evaluation, what is certain is that significant steps must be taken to restart the broader economy and dentistry. Providing frequent close-contact, high-aerosol procedures that are common in dentistry will require meeting several conditions. The two most vital components to this would be the wide availability of rapid testing and sufficient availability of PPE, which is in short supply, as we are all well aware.

Browse through our range of discount dental supplies such as gloves, gowns, goggles, face masks, sanitizers, and disinfectants by clicking on this link -

https://www.nobledentalsupplies.com/infection-control-products

 In order to get back to normal, here’s an infection control checklist for reopening the practice after Coronavirus closures. 

  • Safe practices. 

    When practices do begin seeing patients on a routine basis, safe practices infection prevention consultant and speaker Jackie Dorst, RDH, BS, doesn’t expect everything will look just the way it did before it was put on pause. “There won’t be one big opening of the gates and saying that everything’s all clear. It’s going to be a gradual thing. Densely populated areas may be a little slower to resume medical and dental services than rural areas that are sparsely populated.” Dorst also believes that waiting rooms will need to be reorganized to limit exposure to both patients and staff.

    The patient ideally should be met at the door, greeted, temperature taken, given a mask, a wellness screening, made to practice hand hygiene before they’re even seated in the operatory. It’s definitely going to require schedule planning and time on the dental team’s part.

  • PPE (Personal Protective Equipment)

    Personal protective equipment has always been an important component of infection control efforts at the dental practice. But, in a Covid-19 world, that equipment becomes even more important- along with its proper use and availability. One likely change is the type of PPE worn by staff, Dorst says, and the guidelines surrounding PPE that will become even more stringent.

    From now on, a dental assistant is going to have to wear an N95 respirator mask, with a full-face shield over it, and then an isolation gown, rather than just the clinic jacket or scrubs that they might have worn earlier.

    At Noble Dental Supplies, we offer high quality yet cost effective infection control products like gloves, gowns, goggles, face masks, sanitizers and disinfectants. To have a look at our range of wholesale dental equipment, click on this link - https://www.nobledentalsupplies.com/infection-control-products.

  • Equipment maintenance 
    This downtime has given practices the opportunity to address proper preparation and availability of dental instruments and equipment. Taking stock and getting the input of hygienists and assistants will make sure the office is ready for a full schedule post Coronavirus. Your team will appreciate being heard and the practice will be in great shape when things are in full swing again. Make sure ordering dental supplies in bulk is on the top of your list.

    Putting equipment back into use shouldn’t be difficult, but keep in mind it has been sitting unused and unmaintained for weeks. Be sure to properly service the equipment according to manufacturer instructions.

  • Refreshing skills
    Now is a great time to brush up on infection control policies and procedures, before patients walk through the door. It’s the perfect time to train on OSHA and Infection Control as well as take on written programs like the Exposure Control Plan. If you already have a process in place for screening for tuberculosis and other aerosol transmissible diseases, then it can be modified to include conditions like Covid-19. 

    It’s also very important to ensure that the practice has people in their proper safety roles, such as an infection control coordinator or a safety officer. But remember, safety is not just one person’s job, it is everyone’s job. However, a person in charge who oversees the program is extremely beneficial.

    Buy cheap dental equipment in bulk at Noble Dental Supplies. Our extensive knowledge in sourcing helps bring dentists high-quality dental supplies across a wide range of categories that are 30-50% below the expensive name-brand dental supply products. Click here to visit our website -
    https://www.nobledentalsupplies.com/.

Five Best Items to Have During a Pandemic/ How Should You Prepare For a Pandemic /5 Items to Stock up During the Pandemic

The World Health Organization has declared Covid-19 a pandemic. As the total number of cases in the United States exceed 1 million earlier this week, the WHO has set guidelines for the public to prepare themselves for the effect of the pandemic.

  Covid-19, the novel coronavirus that first caused an outbreak in China in 2019  has rapidly infected people around the globe. According to the CDC, the most vulnerable to this viral threat are people over the age of 60 and those with chronic diseases, such as heart disease, diabetes and lung disease. Everyone around the world has been urged to stay at home as much as possible and practice social distancing. The virus can cause symptoms ranging from cough to high fever, shortness of breath, and in some cases, it can be deadly, particularly in those populations most at risk. 

The first thing you need to do and this is most important. You must not panic. Even though the term pandemic can sound scary, it doesn’t mean the world is ending. Depending on the scale of the pandemic, there can be interruptions to supply chains and economic repercussions. We’ve already seen multiple reports of people stocking up on essentials all at the same time, which has left supermarkets out of stock.

If you’re unable to easily purchase supplies  at short notice, it is worth being prepared so that you can be comfortable staying home if you or someone in your family does get sick and needs to remain in isolation. As the Coronavirus continues its rapid spread internationally and across the U.S. many Americans are following public health advice from the Centers from Disease Control and Prevention to prepare for the possibility of a lengthy home stay.  

So it’s important to have what you need in order to remain at home for a longer period, possibly weeks. That way experts say you’ll be prepared if you need to decrease contact and socialization in case you get sick, or try to prevent illness if there’s an outbreak of coronavirus in your communiy, but rather than panicking and buying more than you need, it’s about being adequately stocked. Just in case you need to shelter in place, or in case stores have limited supplies for some time.

Read on to know more about the best five items to stock up and how you need to prepare yourself for the pandemic, according to experts.

  • Medications

It’s a better idea to have a month’s supply of any medications you might be taking, than running out of stock and not finding any at the last moment. Keep handy any self-care supplies, including items needed to manage chronic disease like blood glucose test trips for diabetes, etc.

 “Check to ensure you have at least a 30-day supply of your prescription medications, and have other health supplies on hand, including pain relievers, stomach remedies, cough and cold medicines, fluids with electrolytes, and vitamins,” advises Anthony Tornetta, a spokesperson for the American Red Cross. Also keep a thermometer and medications to reduce fever handy.

  • Stock Food

Make sure you get foods you like and are comfortable preparing. While the focus should be to stock up on things that won’t go bad in storage, such as soup and canned food; avoid purchasing things that you won’t end up consuming.

 “Non-perishable, easy-to-prepare items are the best to have on hand. These could be things already in your pantry, such as canned goods or snack bars that can last and be easily stored. If you have an infant, make sure to stock up on extra baby food and formula,” Tornetta adds. “Similarly, if you have pets, make sure you have extra pet food in your home as well.” Make sure you have at least two-week’s worth of these supplies for every person in your household. Just make sure to regularly replace any perishable foods and don’t neglect non-perishable stocks. Eating well supports overall health and can bolster immunity at a time when that’s critical. 

  • Stock Up on Cleaning Supplies


Regular hand-washing is important to prevent the spread of disease including coronavirus. At home, soap and, water are more than sufficient. If for some reason, you eventually need to leave your quarantine, it’s a good idea to have antibacterial wipes and/or hand sanitizer gel. Make sure your hand sanitizer is at least 60% alcohol. Get your hands on alcohol-based sanitizer in the comfort of your home, by clicking here - https://www.nobledentalsupplies.com/hand-sanitizer-gel-70-alcohol-w-aloe-mark3

Noble Dental Supplies offers high-quality yet cost-effective enzymatic & ultrasonic cleaners, surface barriers and sterilization pouches. Stock up on your cleaning supplies by placing your order here - https://www.nobledentalsupplies.com/infection-control-products.

Make sure you have all you need to keep your home sanitized. You should have disinfectant sanitizers & tissues, such as Kleenex and paper towels, Gentry suggests. You should also have wipes and diapers and any other supplies you need if you have a baby, he advises.

  • Wearing a Mask

We now know from recent studies that a significant portion of individuals with coronavirus lack symptoms (‘asymptomatic’) and that even those who eventually develop symptoms (pre-symptomatic’) can transmit the virus to others before showing symptoms. This means that the virus can spread between people interacting in close proximity – for example speaking, coughing, or sneezing – even if those people are not exhibiting symptoms. In light of this new evidence, CDC recommends wearing cloth face coverings in public settings where other social distancing measures are difficult to maintain (e.g., grocery stores and pharmacies), especially in areas of significant community-based transmission.

  • Plan Ahead

You must plan ahead when it comes to emergency, so as you stock up on goods, make sure you put a plan in place to monitor the spread of the virus in your community and neighborhood. This plan will guide you in case you get sick. Keep yourself up to date with local and international news as well as national updates from the CDC.

How To Do Your Part In Preventing A Second Wave Of Coronavirus


The Director of the CDC, Robert Redfield in an interview with the Washington Post last week, said that the second wave of Coronavirus, a disease caused by the novel coronavirus, could be worse than the current one that shook the world. “There’s a possibility that the assault of the virus on our nation next winter will be more difficult than the one we just went through,” he said, because it would coincide with the annual flu epidemic, which killed 24,000 to 62,000 people last year alone and caused 18-26 million hospital visits.


Even though several hours later, during Trump’s daily coronavirus press briefing, Redfield was forced to take back his statement saying it is still going to be “more difficult and potentially more complicated, but that doesn’t mean it’s going to be worse”.

As of today roughly 80,000 Americans have died from the coronavirus with a vast majority of them happening in the New York, New Jersey area. For a comparison, more than the 47,434 Americans were killed in combat during the Vietnam War. The total number of cases in the United States exceeded 1 million earlier this week. The 1st four months of this crisis will assuredly mean that when we get out of this, we will all be different people in a very different world.

The coronavirus pandemic may have slowed down in many parts of the country because of strict social distancing efforts but we would still hold off on planning any parties, vacations or trips to the office for a while at least. Experts say the virus won’t be a thing of the past anytime soon.

A second round of Covid-19 cases is ‘inevitable’ as soon as fall arrives, says the country’s top infectious disease doctor, Dr. Anthony Fauci, Director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases. As people increasingly try to resume regular life and more states ease or lift their stay-at-home orders, he says that he is ‘almost certain’ that the virus will come back, because it is so transmissible and globally spread. According to him Americans could be in for ‘a bad fall and a bad winter’, if the country is ill-prepared.

There are many aspects of the virus that remain unknown for scientists, but older viruses are offering some clues. People are usually infected by 4 common coronaviruses that were 1st identified in the mid-1960s, according to the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and those tend to increase multifold in winter months.

Dr. Greg Poland, a professor of medicine and infectious diseases at the Mayo Clinic says that Covid-19 is likely to follow that pattern. If that happens, a second wave of the virus would return just in time for the start of flu season. The flu has been a constant threat to Americans and has been devastating in recent years. The CDC estimates that there were at least 39 million cases of the flu in the US and at least 24,000 deaths during the 2019-2020 seasons. He says that the combination of a second wave of Covid-19 with flu season could create ‘a lot of confusion’ because of their overlap in symptoms and it could also put a heavy strain on the health care system.

It appears that the novel coronavirus is likely to keep spreading for at least another 18 months. There are several possible scenarios for the course of the pandemic, but the worst of them is s second wave of infections just like the 1918 influenza pandemic, according to a report by the Center for Infectious Disease Research and Policy at the University of Minnesota.

Mike Osterholm, CIDRAP Director, co-authored a report released recently that recommended the US prepare for a worst-case scenario. The report includes preparation guidelines for a second big wave of coronavirus infections in the fall and winter.

How to Prevent Second Wave of Coronavirus

According to health experts, the coming months would be a good time to prepare for a potential second outbreak of the virus. 

  • Hospitals and clinics should refurbish their stocks of PPE (Personal Protective Equipment) and testing supplies. Order your PPE with zero hassles by clicking here - https://www.nobledentalsupplies.com/kleenguard-a70-chemical-spray-protective-yellow-coveralls-12cs-kimberly-clark 
  • People should try to get healthier if possible and continue using face masks for the time being. Gatherings should be kept to no more than 10 people at a time.
  • As cities reopen, local officials should make plans to swiftly reissue stay-at-home orders or other strict social distancing measures in the future, in case it is needed. 
  • Health officials across the country must continue focusing on expanding coronavirus testing, contact tracing and treatment, said Dr. Helen Boucher, Chief of the Geographic Medicine and Infectious Diseases Division at Tufts University Medical Center. Improving the way health workers handle the coronavirus pandemic will be key, so the country is ‘as prepared as we can be’ when it’s time to face an outbreak of both the coronavirus and the flu. Check out all our discounted medical supplies at https://www.nobledentalsupplies.com/.

While most experts believe that people who have recovered from the virus will have some sort of immunity, Poland says it is unclear how strong that immunity might be, how long it might last and the accuracy of antibody tests is inconsistent. A lot of hope is being placed on the fact that there are no definitive answers yet, because there’s still a lot scientists don’t know. 

Even though the worst is over, the months to come are not going to be ‘good’ but merely ‘less bad’. All in all, we’re probably living with this virus affecting our lives for one to two years, unless there is a breakthrough and really speedy production and distribution of a vaccine. 

Getting Back To Normal And How Dentists Can Start Stocking Up Again/ Tips on Reopening Your Dental Practice Post Coronavirus

As the nation begins to slowly reopen different sectors of the economy, it is important to consider how this “return to practice” will work for the dental industry.

Natasha Lee, DDS, a practicing dentist in San Francisco, was appointed for this effort by the Gov. Gavin Newsom to California’s Economic Recovery Task Force. Dr. Lee is also a member of CDA’s Covid-19 Clinical Care Workgroup and Economic Recovery Workgroup.

 The federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services and the California Department of Public Health in March and Early April, issued guidance that dentists should perform only urgent and emergency care. This guidance was driven by data that demonstrated an alarming rise in community transmission across the country and the need to flatten the Covid-19 curve of infection and death. It was also done in order to protect dental personnel and their patients from the virus. CDA, ADA and most state dental organizations issued recommendations consistent with the federal and respective state authorities regarding how to apply the guidance in serving patients during the crisis.


In addition to enormous advocacy for economic relief, the next critical phase of work is to address recommendations regarding when the profession may resume thorough patient care and what practice changes will be needed to provide that kind of care.

  CDA President Richard Nagy, DDS, and California State Dental Director Jay Kumar, DDS, have established a workgroup composed of dental practitioners, academicians and researchers to help establish the recommendations for this futuristic path.

The workgroup’s return-to-practice guidance will be informed by dental office infection control fundamentals and Covid-19 specific research and advisories. Also, the workgroup is monitoring federal and state advisories and conditions for reopening the economy.

While there are many details that still need evaluation, what is certain is that significant steps must be taken to restart the broader economy and dentistry. Providing frequent close-contact, high-aerosol procedures that are common in dentistry will require meeting several conditions. The two most vital components to this would be the wide availability of rapid testing and sufficient availability of PPE, which is in short supply, as we are all well aware.

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In order to get back to normal, here’s an infection control checklist for reopening the practice after Coronavirus closures.

  • Safe practices

When practices do begin seeing patients on a routine basis, safe practices infection prevention consultant and speaker Jackie Dorst, RDH, BS, doesn’t expect everything will look just the way it did before it was put on pause. “There won’t be one big opening of the gates and saying that everything’s all clear. It’s going to be a gradual thing. Densely populated areas may be a little slower to resume medical and dental services than rural areas that are sparsely populated.” Dorst also believes that waiting rooms will need to be reorganized to limit exposure to both patients and staff.

  The patient ideally should be met at the door, greeted, temperature taken, given a mask, a wellness screening, made to practice hand hygiene before they’re even seated in the operatory. It’s definitely going to require schedule planning and time on the dental team’s part

  • PPE (Personal Protective Equipment)


Personal protective equipment has always been an important component of infection control efforts at the dental practice. But, in a Covid-19 world, that equipment becomes even more important- along with its proper use and availability. One likely change is the type of PPE worn by staff, Dorst says, and the guidelines surrounding PPE that will become even more stringent.

  From now on, a dental assistant is going to have to wear an N95 respirator mask, with a full-face shield over it, and then an isolation gown, rather than just the clinic jacket or scrubs that they might have worn earlier. 

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  • Equipment maintenance

This downtime has given practices the opportunity to address proper preparation and availability of dental instruments and equipment. Taking stock and getting the input of hygienists and assistants will make sure the office is ready for a full schedule post Coronavirus. Your team will appreciate being heard and the practice will be in great shape when things are in full swing again. Make sure ordering dental supplies in bulk is on the top of your list.


Putting equipment back into use shouldn’t be difficult, but keep in mind it has been sitting unused and unmaintained for weeks. Be sure to properly service the equipment according to manufacturer instructions.

  • Refreshing skills

Now is a great time to brush up on infection control policies and procedures, before patients walk through the door. It’s the perfect time to train on OSHA and Infection Control as well as take on written programs like the Exposure Control Plan. If you already have a process in place for screening for tuberculosis and other aerosol transmissible diseases, then it can be modified to include conditions like Covid-19.


It’s also very important to ensure that the practice has people in their proper safety roles, such as an infection control coordinator or a safety officer. But remember, safety is not just one person’s job, it is everyone’s job. However, a person in charge who oversees the program is extremely beneficial.

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Get Your Home Ready For Coronavirus Disease (COVID-19) (What Can I Do To Prevent The Coronavirus Disease At Home?)

SARS-CoV-2 or (Covid-19) is an infectious disease caused by a newly emerging novel coronavirus. Most people who get infected with the Covid-19 virus will experience mild to moderate respiratory illness and recover without requiring special treatment; however, older people and those with underlying medical problems like cardiovascular disease, diabetes, chronic respiratory disease, and cancer are more likely to have complications while contracted with the coronavirus.

The best way to prevent and slow down transmission is to informed yourself about the Covid-19 virus, how it may affect your body, and how it spreads. The best way to protect yourself and others from infection is by washing your hands or using an alcohol-based rub as often as possible.

The Covid-19 virus spreads primarily through droplets of saliva or discharge from the nose when an infected person coughs or sneezes, so it’s important that you also practice proper etiquette when coughing or sneezing like coughing into your elbow.

Before a Covid-19 outbreak occurs in your community it is important to plan. It’s unknown just how long a Covid-19 outbreak could last in your community. Depending on the severity of the outbreak, public health officials may recommend community actions designed to help keep people healthy and reduce exposures to Covid-19 Local public health officials may make recommendations appropriate to your local situation. Creating household plan can help protect your health and the health of those in your community. In the event of a local outbreak in your community you should create the a household plan that is centered around the needs and daily routine of your household members.

Prevent coronavirus disease at home

  • Talk with those who need to be included in your plan. Meet with household members, other relatives, and friends to discuss what to do if a Covid-19 outbreak occurs in your community and what the needs of each person will be. This can be done or FaceTime, Skype, or Zoom if you’re unable to meet face to face.
  • Plan ways to care for those who might be at greater risk for serious complications. There is limited information about who exactly may be at risk for severe complications from Covid-19 illness. From the data that is available for Covid-19 patients, and from the data of related coronaviruses such as SARS-CoV and MERS-CoV, it’s seems that older adults and people who have underlying medical conditions are more at risk for serious complications. Early data suggest older people are more likely to have serious Covid-19 illness. If you or your household members are at an increased risk for Covid-19 complications, please consult with your healthcare provider for more information about monitoring your health for symptoms suggestive of Covid-19. The Centers for Diease Control (CDC) is a good source of information to help stay informed.
  • Get to know your neighbors. Talk with your neighbors about emergency planning. If your neighborhood has a website or social media page, consider joining it to maintain access to neighbors, information, and resources.
  • Identify aid organizations in your community. Create a list of local organizations that you and your household can contact in the event you need access to information, health care services, support, and resources. Consider including organizations that provide mental health or counseling services, food, and other essential supplies.
  • Create an emergency contact list. Ensure your household has a current list of emergency contacts for family, friends, neighbors, carpool drivers, health care providers, teachers, employers, the local public health department, and other community resources.
  • Practice good personal health habits and plan for home-based actions.
  • Practice preventive actions daily. Remind everyone in your household the importance of consistency when practicing these habits. It can help prevent the spread of respiratory illnesses:

- Avoid close contact with people who are sick

- Stay home when you are sick, except to receive medical care.

- Cover your coughs and sneezes with a tissue

- Clean frequently touched surfaces and objects daily using regular household detergent and water.

- If surfaces are dirty, they should be cleaned using a detergent and water prior to disinfection.

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  • Wash your hands with soap and water for at least twenty seconds; especially after going to the bathroom, before you eat, and after blowing your nose, coughing, or sneezing. If soap and water are not available, use a hand sanitizer that contains at least 60% alcohol if possible. Always wash your hands with soap and water if your hands are visibly dirty.

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  • Choose a room in your home that can be used to separate sick household members from those who are healthy. Identify a separate bathroom for the sick person to use, if possible. Plan to clean these rooms, as needed, when someone is sick.

Plan for potential changes at your workplace

  • Learn about your employer’s emergency operations plan. Discuss sick-leave policies and telework options for workers who are sick or who need to stay home to care for sick household members. Learn how businesses and employers can plan for and respond to Covid-19.

During a Covid-19 outbreak in your community: ACT

During an outbreak in your community, protect yourself and others by:

- Staying home from work, school, and all activities when you are sick with Covid-19 symptoms, which may include fever, cough and difficulty breathing.

- Keep away from others who are sick

- Limit close contact with others as much as possible (about 6 feet)

- Put your household plan in  action

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Are Masks Effective Against the Coronavirus Disease? When & How To Use Masks

At the beginning of what officials warned could be the deadliest week of the coronavirus pandemic, the United States recorded more than 1,200 coronavirus deaths in 24 hours, bringing the total number to 32,000 as of Thursday, April 16th according to NBC’s official tally.

Coronavirus disease (Covid-19) is an infectious disease caused by an unknown virus. The disease causes respiratory illness (like the flu) with symptoms such as cough, fever, and in more severe cases, difficulty breathing. You can protect yourself by washing your hands, avoid touching your face, and coming into close contact (1 meter or 3 feet) with people who are unwell.

The novel coronavirus disease spreads primarily through contact with an infected person when they cough or sneeze. It also spreads when a person touches a surface or an object that has the virus on it. We’re going to be highlighting some basics about the effectiveness of facial masks, when they’re necessary, and how to use masks to  to stay safe and avoid spreading the coronavirus.

Do masks work to protect against the coronavirus disease?

Ordinary medical masks cannot protect against the new coronavirus when used alone. Wearing a mask alone will not prevnt the current virus, it’s best to combine other preventive measures as well. The World Health Organization or WHO only recommends the use of masks in specific cases.

If you have cough, fever, or difficulty breathing, you should wear a mask and seek medical care. If you do not have these symptoms, you do not have to wear masks because there is no evidence that they protect people who are not sick.

However, if you are healthy, but you are taking care of a person who may be infected with the new coronavirus, then you should wear a mask whenever you are in the same room with that person. Remember, if you choose to wear a mask, use it and discard it properly. Clean your hands extensively with soap and water or hand sanitizer if you’re unable to access water and soap.

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When and how to wear medical masks to protect against coronavirus

If you do not have any respiratory symptoms such as fever, cough, or runny nose, you do not need to wear an ordinary medical mask. Masks alone can give you a false feeling of protection and can even be a source of infection when not used correctly. Masks should only be used by healthcare workers, caretakers, and by people who are sick with symptoms like fever and cough.

Who is at higher risk?

According to the CDC, early information shows that some people are a higher risk of getting very sick from Covid-19. This includes older adults and people of any age who:

- Have serious underlying medical conditions, such as heart, lung, or liver disease; diabetes; moderate to severe asthma; severe obesity; and renal failure.

- Have a weakened immune system, including those who are undergoing or have undergone cancer treatments.

- Pregnant women should also be monitored since they are known to be at risk with severe viral illness; however, to date data on Covid-19 has not shown an increased risk for women who are pregnant.

- If you are at higher risk for serious illness from Covid-19, it is critical for you to take actions to avoid getting sick.

- Stay home, avoid close contact with others and follow the other steps above

- Call your healthcare provider if you have concerns or ask about obtaining extra necessary medications in case you need to stay home for a prolonged period of time.

- Call a medical professional as soon as Covid-19 symptoms start, if you are at higher risk.

How are facemasks effective, you ask?

They’re effective because those who are healthcare workers and caretakers come into close contact with ill individuals, so the healthcare workers are at higher risk of catching Covid-19. Sick people who are being taken care of should wear masks in order to protect others from getting the virus. This is how healthcare workers, caretakers, or individuals who have fever and cough should use the mask:

- Before touching the mask, clean your hands with an alcohol based hand rub or soap and water.

- You must inspect the mask for tears and holes.

- You must verify which side is the top. It’s usually where the metal piece is.

- Identify the inside of the mask which is usually the white side.

- Fit the mask on your face and pinch the metal strip/stiff edge so it molds to the shape of your nose.

- Adjust the mask on your face covering your mouth and chin, making sure there are no gaps between your face and mask.

- Do not touch the front of the mask while using it to avoid contamination.

- If you accidently touch it, clean your hands.

How to dispose a mask?

- To take off the mask, remove the elastics from behind, without touching the front and while keeping it away from your face.

- Discard the mask immediately in a closed bin and clean your hands.

- It is important not to re-use a mask and you must replace it with a new one as soon as it gets damp.

Remember, the best way to protect yourself from the new coronavirus is by frequently cleaning your hands with an alcohol-based rub and soap and water.

Stay safe and don’t forget to check out our website - https://www.nobledentalsupplies.com/ for all your medical supply needs. Call us at 1.866.333.6825 if you have any queries.

FTC Judge Finds Evidence Large Dental Manufacturers Conspired to Block Dental Buying Groups

Healthy competition is a cornerstone of the American economy. While price is largely a result of supply and demand, everyone should be able to come to the playing field and compete in a free market. Market forces should determine who is competitive and successful and who fails due to poor quality or inflated price tags. But when big businesses collude together to fix prices artificially or block smaller competitors, it is the consumer who suffers. This concept is true for any product, including dental supplies.

A Federal Trade Commission (FTC) administrative judge recently found compelling evidence that three large dental manufacturers/suppliers – Benco, Schein, and Patterson – conspired to prevent dental buying groups from accessing legitimate discounting and discouraged them from offering competing products to their customers. Also known as group purchasing organizations (GPOs) or buying clubs, buying groups are composed of independent dental practitioners who collectively negotiate savings on dental supplies. These groups provide small “mom and pop” dentists with the same discount opportunities that large group practices or corporate dental groups enjoy.

The big three companies mentioned above feared the effect this group buying power could have on their profits. Instead of competing honestly for buying groups’ business, Benco, Schein, and Patterson agreed to shut out these buying groups. In other words, they conspired to withhold discounts from buying groups and even collectively refused to negotiate with these groups.

The directive to “blacklist” buying groups came from the highest levels of these powerful companies, and the FTC judge found that they likely violated the antitrust provisions of the Sherman Act. The executives’ actions were egregious, and the evidence was overwhelming. For example, here is an excerpt of an email that Chuck Cohen, the managing director at Benco, sent to other Benco officials when he heard that Patterson was considering offering discounts to the New Mexico Dental Cooperative buying group:

“We don’t recognize buying groups… I’ll reach out to my counterpart at Patterson to let him know what’s going on…”

Cohen sent an email to Paul Guggenheim, the president of Patterson, and Guggenheim responded:

“Thanks for the heads up. I’ll investigate the situation. We feel the same way about these.”

Guggenheim then ordered his vice president of sales to pull out of the New Mexico partnership. These are just small examples of the conspiracy. The emails and phone calls went on and on, with Schein taking part as well. The three companies canceled appearances at buying group trade shows and continued to encourage each other not to work with buying groups.

Fortunately, this unethical and illegal conduct has not gone unanswered. The FTC has denied a motion put forth by Patterson for summary dismissal of the charges, and the case will go to trial.

Although it seems like the big companies will use every dirty trick to stifle competition and keep prices artificially high, some businesses still work for the little guys. While huge outfits like the three companies in the FTC action are beholden to their shareholders and ultra-wealthy executives, Noble Dental Supplies works for the benefit of our customers – no matter how small or large.

We have been in the dental supply industry for 40 years and remain dedicated to providing high-quality products at significantly discounted prices. We built our reputation on personal relationships, and we will never compromise on quality or dependable service.